Marlins Sign Jay Gibbons

The Marlins have signed Jay Gibbons to a minor league contract. The 31 year old lefty may end up as a good backup at first and in the outfield.

This is a low-risk signing for the Fish with a big upside as Gibbons has been a solid player through out his career. Unfortunately, he was named in the Mitchell Report and teams avioded him last season. With that cloud fading away, Gibbons has something to prove which is always a good motivator. You have to wonder how much impact Gibbons’ former teammate and now Marlins front office employee Jeff Conine had to do with this decision.

Henry Owens Suspended 50 Games

For using a “performance enhancing substance”. Really.

You may have forgotten Henry Owens who was the other stud pitcher came to the Marlins in that awesome Vargas trade. While recovering from season ending shoulder surgery, it seems that he failed a drug test. We may still find out more of this later but for now, don’t bet on seeing him in the Majors anytime soon.

Update: Quote from the Sun-Sentinel:

Owens said: “I made a mistake. I apologize. Now I have to deal with the consequences and work hard to get through this situation.”

The Marlins issued the following statement: “We are disappointed that Henry Owens received a positive test, and fully endorse the discipline outlined in the MLB policy. We will continue to work with and educate our players to help prevent any further violations.”

Fun.

Blog Quote of the Week

From the good guys at FishStripes:

Lo Duca was traded to the Marlins in July 2004 and the last evidence in the report of him buying performance enhancing drugs was in August of the same year. Lo Duca signed a three-year deal with the Marlins in January of 2005.

If the report is accurate, the Dodgers juiced him up and sold the Marlins a bill of goods and the only way I can see to right the wrong is to give us Brad Penny back and have the Dodgers pay out Penny’s existing contract. And you wonder why I’m not the commissioner.

Details on Former Marlins in the Mitchell Report

Since many of you are wondering how former Marlins appeared in the Mitchell Report, here are highlights for each player (source: ESPN).

As for specific players using substances while with the Marlins, from what we can tell, Paul Lo Duca was known to have purchased just days prior to joining the Marlins, Ricky Bones was caught with it in his Marlins locker, Matt Herges received his HGH in the off-season before joining the Marlins, while Chad Allen used it in the off-season after his only season with the Marlins. There is, of course, that devistating statement by Luis Perez, a former Marlins bullpen catcher saying “Virtually every player on the Marlins was ‘doing something’ ranging from steroids and greenies, to marijuana, etc.”

  • Kevin Brown

    In the notes of the October 2003 meetings among Dodgers officials, it was reportedly said of Brown: “Kevin Brown — getting to the age of nagging injuries … Question what kind of medication he takes … Effectiveness goes down covering 1st base or running bases. Common in soccer players and are more susceptible if you take meds to increase your muscles — doesn’t increase the attachments. Is he open to adjusting how he takes care of himself? He knows he now needs to do stuff before coming to spring training to be ready. Steroids speculated by GM.”

  • Paul Lo Duca

    Radomski produced copies of three checks from Lo Duca, each in the amount of $3,200. All are included in the Appendix. Radomski said that each check was in payment for two kits of human growth hormone. Lo Duca’s name, with an address and telephone number, is listed in the address book seized from Radomski’s residence by federal agents.

  • Josias Manzanillo

    Radomski said that he did not sell any steroids to Manzanillo and that his only substance-related involvement with Manzanillo was when he injected him with steroids in the clubhouse. Radomski stated that he remembered the event clearly because it was the only time he ever injected a player with steroids.

  • Gregg Zaun

    …in September 2002 Luis Perez, a bullpen catcher for the Montreal Expos, was arrested for possession of a pound of marijuana. In January 2003, he was interviewed by investigators from the Commissioner’s Office.400 Perez told those investigators that he had personally supplied anabolic steroids to Zaun and seven other major league ball players.

  • Ricky Bones

    In late June 2000, a clubhouse attendant with the Florida Marlins brought a paper bag to the club’s athletic trainers that had been found in the locker of Marlins pitcher Ricky Bones. The bag contained over two dozen syringes, six vials of injectable medications – stanozolol and nandrolone decanoate, two anabolic steroids that are sold under the names Winstrol and Deca-Durabolin, respectively – and a page of handwritten instructions on how to administer the drugs.

  • Ron Villone

    Villone first purchased human growth hormone from Radomski during the 2004 season. Radomski sent this order to Villone at the Seattle Mariners’ clubhouse. For the second transaction, Radomski met Villone during the 2004-05 off-season at a diner where Radomski personally delivered the human growth hormone to him. Villone’s third purchase from Radomski took place during the 2005 season. Radomski sent that package to Villone’s residence in Seattle.

  • Matt Herges

    Radomski produced one check from Herges dated November 1, 2005 in the amount of $3,240 … Radomski said that this check was in payment for two kits of human growth hormone, plus $40 for shipping. A piece of an undated shipping receipt to Herges and a copy of an Express Mail receipt dated November 2, 2005 sent to the same address were seized from Radomski’s residence by federal agents.

  • Chad Allen

    According to Allen, the 2003 off-season was the only occasion when he used steroids. Allen explained that he did not want his teammates to know that he used steroids, and he did not want to use anything during the season because he “did not want to be on a different playing field from his teammates.” He also was concerned about testing positive.

  • Ismael Valdez

    According to [the San Francisco Chronicle], on September 7, 2002, while he was playing with the Mariners, Valdez “used a credit to card to buy nearly $2,500 worth of human growth hormone,” which was shipped to him at the Texas Rangers ballpark in Arlington, Texas where Valdez had been playing until he was traded to the Mariners the prior month. Ten days later, Valdez reportedly purchased Novarel, clomiphene, and Arimidex from the center, all of which are used to counteract the effects of steroid abuse.502 The article reported that “Valdez’s prescriptions were written by the same dentist who prescribed drugs to [Paul] Byrd, [Jose] Guillen and [retired infielder Matt] Williams.”

  • Gary Sheffield

    In September 2003, when federal agents executed a search warrant on Greg Anderson’s condominium, they cited a February 2003 FedEx receipt from Gary Sheffield to BALCO as evidence of probable cause to conduct the search.354 In his 2007 book entitled Inside Power, Sheffield acknowledged he had received a bill from BALCO for what he called “vitamins” and claimed he did not know whether the “cream” he acknowledged using during his grand jury testimony had contained steroids.

  • Benito Santiago

    At the end of the 2003 season, Mike Murphy, a Giants clubhouse attendant, was cleaning out Santiago’s locker when he found a sealed package of syringes. Murphy brought the syringes to the training room, handed them to Conte, and told Conte that he had found them in Santiago’s locker. Conte responded that he “would take care of it.”

Mitchell Report Out: Steroids Found in Marlins Locker Room

“Virtually every player on the Marlins was ‘doing something’ ranging from steroids and greenies, to marijuana, etc.”
— Luis Perez, former Marlins bullpen catcher

The Mitchell Report is out and you can view it here.

Former Senator Mitchell served on the Florida Marlins Board of Directors in 2000 and 2001.

The Marlins are named in an incident that happened in 2000:

C. Discovery of Steroids in Florida Marlins Player’s Locker, June 2000
In late June 2000, a clubhouse attendant with the Florida Marlins brought a paper bag to the club’s athletic trainers that had been found in the locker of Marlins pitcher Ricky Bones. The bag contained over two dozen syringes, six vials of injectable medications – stanozolol and nandrolone decanoate, two anabolic steroids that are sold under the names Winstrol and Deca-Durabolin, respectively – and a page of handwritten instructions on how to administer the drugs. Soon thereafter, the athletic trainers returned the bag and its contents to Bones at his request.



The athletic trainers’ initial reaction not to report the discovery of steroids in a player’s possession did not comply with this policy. The next day, however, the matter was brought to the attention of Dave Dombrowski, the Marlins’ general manager, who immediately reported it to the Commissioner’s Office, which said its staff would “take it from here.”

Also:

F. Bullpen Catcher Admits to Supplying Steroids to
Eight Major League Players, September 2002 On September 26, 2002, during a game against the Florida Marlins at Montreal’s Olympic Stadium, Montreal’s bullpen catcher Luis Perez asked a Marlins clubhouse attendant if he would carry a duffel bag back to Florida for him. The Marlins employee, who knew Perez from his previous tenure as a bullpen catcher with the Marlins, agreed. Perez later delivered a large padlocked duffel bag to be included with the Marlins luggage. Marlins equipment manager John Silverman was suspicious because of the padlock and directed that the bag be opened. When it was (using a combination that Perez provided), Silverman and the clubhouse attendant discovered a box coated on the inside with pine tar that contained two plastic packages amounting to one pound of marijuana.



After the criminal process had ended, Hallinan and his deputy, Martin Maguire, traveled to Miami to interview Perez. Perez explained that during his time as a bullpen catcher for the Florida Marlins, between 1998 until 2001, two players asked if he could obtain steroids for them. After he was successful in doing so, word spread and he became a source for players to acquire steroids and other drugs. Perez alleged that he had witnessed widespread use of steroids and other drugs. According to Hallinan’s memo, Perez told baseball officials “. . . that virtually every player on the Marlins was ‘doing something’ ranging from steroids and greenies, to marijuana, etc. He also claimed that every pitcher in Montreal’s bullpen was on some form of steroid.”

Perez told Hallinan that when teams were in San Diego, players often crossed the border into Mexico to obtain illegal substances. He said that he knew of clubhouse employees with other teams who were similarly called upon to obtain drugs for players, including in particular a visiting clubhouse attendant in Philadelphia. Perez also claimed that he was paid as much as $500 by certain players to carry their bags on trips to and from Canada. At the conclusion of their interview of him, Perez’s lawyer handed to Hallinan and Maguire a typed list of players and their “drug of choice” that had been compiled by Perez. The list identified eight players (with the Marlins, Astros, and Expos) for whom Perez personally had acquired anabolic steroids, in addition to identifying twelve players for whom Perez had obtained other drugs.

Congrats to the following former Marlins for being named as steroid or HGH users (although, not all used it while playing with the fish):

Photo by Flickr user ad-vantage