• 2008 All Star Game
  • All-Star Voting Sucks

  • Since no one shows up to games at Joe Robbie Stadium, Hanley Ramirez lost his status as leading vote-getter among NL shortstops. 72-year old shortstop Miguel Tejada of the Astros is now up by almost 120K votes. Clearly, Astros fans are doing their job because all of the Astros infielders are getting quite a few votes.

    Tejada is having a good year (.300 BA, 7 HR, 39 RBI, .335 OBP, .466 SLG, 46 R, 5 SB) but Hanley is having a better year (.299 BA, 14 HR, 31 RBI, .389 OBP, .525 SLG, 53 R, 15 SB). Yes, I realize that Tejada has 8 more RBIs, but he bats 3rd in the lineup while Hanley has spent most of the season at leadoff.

    All I can say is keep voting Marlins fans.

  • Opinion
  • The More the Ballpark Seems Certain, the Less it is

  • We’ve previously discussed the concern that the Ballpark may be facing obstacles at the County level. Now comes word from Bob DuPuy that this is potentially a real problem:

    DuPuy said “the coalition at county commission level is tenuous” for the Florida Marlins’ proposed new ballpark.

    The City and County did a great job trying to ram the ballpark through as quickly as possible but it’s clear that some politicians are ready to sink this ship. I don’t know if they are sincere in their concerns or merely grandstanding for cheap political tricks but it’s time to pick sides.

    Consider me worried.

  • Opinion
  • Loser
  • South Florida Loves Losing

  • Greg Cote wrote a good commentary in Today’s Miami Herald asking why South Florida fans are not coming to ball games.

    South Floridians were able to cheer a division-leading, first-place professional sports team at home Tuesday night. Ordinarily, this would not qualify as news, let alone a revelation, but the recent rarity makes it so.

    Considering how bad South Florida teams were this year (except for the Panthers but they still didn’t make the playoffs) it’s legitimate to ask why people aren’t showing up to watch a first place team with an 8-5 record who is playing entertaining baseball. You can make excuses about the payroll but it’s on the field performance that matters and unlike the Dolphins, who won 1 game all year long, and the Heat, who will likely end up with 15 wins, the Marlins are winning more than they are losing. More

  • Opinion
  • Marlins Beat Nats 10-7; Beat Head Over Day Off Tomorrow

  • Marlins win with home runs. Once again starting pitching can’t get to the 6th (or out of the 4th, for that matter). If we solve that problem we’ll continue to be the first-place Florida Marlins.

    Note to MLB: Having a day off tomorrow is not cool. Why not just start the series tomorrow? And why do the Nationals have a one-game opening day, then another home game a week later followed by another day off before their third home game?

  • Opinion
  • Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch

  • Local media, instead of unequivocally supporting the hometown team, again find the most inappropriate time to attack the team. After all, nothing helps a team desperately in need of public support more than a public attack on perhaps their most visible day of the year.

  • Opinion
  • Poetic On Opening Day

  • Today is the best day of they year. America’s pastime and our obsession begins. Today we’re all undefeated and in first place (except for the Red Sox and A’s, but we won’t get into that). Even though all the analysts have decided how we will do (hint: last in the NL East), today we look ahead and wonder. We’ve seen veteran teams achieve (1997) and underachieve (2005) and we’ve seen young teams fail (1998), struggle (2006), and win it all (2003). So today we celebrate the best day of the year More

  • Opinion
  • The Marlins Can’t Win Even When They Do

  • The Sun-Sentinel had an interesting take on last night’s exhibition game against the Yankees:

    sun-sentinel_small.jpg

    I’m pretty sure the headline is wrong. Here is what the Miami Herald said:

    miamihearld_small.jpg

    I wonder who got it right?

    We kid of course. Unlike the headline, Juan C. Rodriguez’s article accurately captured the result of the game. The rest of the article though, hmm… Check out this nugget:

    sun-sentinel_arod.jpg

    Either A-Rod was born in 1985 (rather than 1975) or the Marlins played in the NLDS against the Giants in 1987, before they existed. Maybe they meant yesterday’s starting pitcher, Andrew Miller, who attended the 2003 World Series. I’m sure it’s a common mistake to confuse Alex Rodriguez with Andrew Miller. Happened to me on my Fantasy Team. Maybe A-Rod plays for the Marlins now. We seem to remember covering it this past fall.

    I’m sure by the time you read this, they fixed it. Don’t worry, we all make mistakes (thankfully, I’m a hack not a journalist).

  • Opinion
  • A Classy Move for a Classy Player

  • Jeff Conine - All Star Game MVPIf this report is true, and you must believe that at this point it should be, the Florida Marlins will honor Jeff Conine with an appropriate retirement act:

    According to a source, Jeff Conine, one of the most popular players in Florida history, will sign a one-day contract on March 28, and then retire as a member of the Marlins.

    The team also plans on honoring Conine during an on-field ceremony before their March 31 season opener against the Mets.

    While it doesn’t appear as if the team will retire one of Jeff Conine’s numbers (18 and 19), we hope that changes one day (remember that Mike Lowell also wore 19, making it hard to retire it).

    Fans and observers like to criticize team management for not caring about the team, its players, and the fans. But this event, should it happen, suggests that some are quick to judge (and perhaps carry and unfair bias). This is an honorable move that reminds us that there is some good in the game and that there are many good people in it.

  • Opinion
  • Baseball Reality Bites: Broward County Edition

  • Remember how those clowns in Broward County decided to throw money at the Baltimore Orioles for their stupid spring training site instead of investing those resources in a Marlins ballpark? Well, the Orioles are about to flip Broward off on their way up to Vero Beach.

    Two Fort Lauderdale city commissioners suspect the Baltimore Orioles may abandon plans to overhaul Fort Lauderdale Stadium in favor of moving to Dodgertown in Vero Beach.

    A source told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel on Thursday the team has an option agreement with Indian River County to move to Dodgertown, once the Los Angeles Dodgers move to Arizona, expected in 2009 or 2010.

    Now, I know $40 Million is not the same as $400 Million, but Broward’s weird decision to spend so much on 30 days of spring training made no sense when you consider that a 30-year 81-day partner was looking for a deal.

    Photo by Flickr user Photographically Yours, Inc.
  • Opinion
  • Blog Quote of the Week

  • From the good guys at FishStripes:

    Lo Duca was traded to the Marlins in July 2004 and the last evidence in the report of him buying performance enhancing drugs was in August of the same year. Lo Duca signed a three-year deal with the Marlins in January of 2005.

    If the report is accurate, the Dodgers juiced him up and sold the Marlins a bill of goods and the only way I can see to right the wrong is to give us Brad Penny back and have the Dodgers pay out Penny’s existing contract. And you wonder why I’m not the commissioner.

  • Opinion
  • marlins_miguel_lonely_small
  • Post Trade Hangover

  • Now that we’ve all had a day to digest the big trade, here are some of our thoughts:

    Most Marlins fans are angry. We traded away the best hitter and the best pitcher in franchise history. Both likable, both marketable, both young. Most people haven’t heard of any of the guys we got in return.

    The more we read, the more it sounds like Andrew Miller is the real deal. Tall and powerful with a slider and a cutter.

    He’s only 20 years old, but you have to wonder whether Cameron Maybin is nothing more than another Preston Wilson or even worse Reggie Abercrombie

    Dallas Trahern may end up being a diamond in the rough.

    What did we get for Dontrelle? We should have received Miller, Maybin, Rabelo and probably one of the other pitching prospects for Cabrera alone.

    It’s Hanley’s team now.

    Who’s on third? I say Uggla and lets find a good defensive second basemen. Pitching and defense wins games.

    We all know the payroll is very low so would the team consider a one-year “special” deal for Andruw Jones?

    And about that payroll issue: The Marlins are profitable with this kind of payroll. It may not be as high as Forbes estimated, but it should be quite a bit. The Marlins can do themselves a great benefit if they come out and tell us that they are setting aside all this money to help build a ballpark. Miggie and Dontrelle for a new ballpark? I’d accept that deal.

    Finally, whatever happened to Dave Dombrowksi? He used to be a genius at acquiring great young talent. Now he’s collecting former Marlins and trading away his entire farm.

    Optimism from DeadSpin: “it wouldn’t surprise us in the least to see that collection of Florida cheap youngsters do one of their patented annoying wild-card runs to the World Series in a couple of years”

  • Opinion
    • Sashimi
    • RETWEETED
      6 years ago
    • Oops, just saw that you already reported that! Sorry for the redundancy!

    • Sashimi
    • RETWEETED
      6 years ago
    • It was reported that the Tigers turned down a proposal that included both Maybin and Miller for Cabrera alone. Willis was required to get both in the deal.

  • White Sox Trying to Acquire a “Big Fish”

  • The Chicago White Sox have acquired Cabrera. That is, Orlando Cabrera from the Angels.

    But that’s not the story here.

    Looks like they’re focused on an all-Cabrera left side of the infield as their GM Ken Williams claims that this deal clears some financial room ($3MM) for another deal. And that deal is:

    “We’re not done yet. We’re still trying to land a big fish,” Williams said.

    You know who which fish he’s talking about.

  • Opinion
  • Why the Florida Marlins Should Trade Miguel Cabrera

  • We’ve been debating here what to do with Miguel Cabrera and here is one view:

    The more I think about it, the more I am OK with trading Cabrera (assuming the trade is for value).

    With all this Cabrera talk, did anybody every realize that trading him might not be the a bad thing for the club? First, they can get a lot in return (and are apparently asking for a lot). Second, given the Marlins’ revenue constraints, is Cabrera really worth the cost?

    Take a look at these stats… Is Cabrera really that far ahead of Hanley or Uggla?


    Player POS G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI TB BB SO SB CS OBP SLG AVG
    Cabrera 3B 157 588 91 188 38 2 34 119 332 79 127 2 1 .401 .565 .320
    Ramirez SS 154 639 125 212 48 6 29 81 359 52 95 51 14 .386 .562 .332
    Uggla 2B 159 632 113 155 49 3 31 88 303 68 167 2 1 .326 .476 .245


    Hanley struck out 30% less while having 10% more total bases than Cabrera and still hitting nearly 30 home runs and having nearly identical slugging percentage. That, and Ramirez can steal bases while Cabrera prefers to eat them. Uggla, in the meantime, strikes out way too much, but puts up very respectable numbers. So, while losing Cabrera would mean losing a well known player, it doesn’t, necessarily, hurt the team’s offense as much as, say, the Heat playing without Dwayne Wade or any football team losing its quarterback (not using the Dolphins as an example since they don’t really have a good quarterback). The question then has to be asked, with Ramirez and Uggla (not to mention Hermida, Willingham, and Jacobs — all of whom can hit 20 home runs and in Hermida’s case, for average if healthy), is Cabrera really the “franchise player” on which the future of this team hangs? Or is this just a popularity issue?

    Now, if you are the Marlins, you can keep Cabrera for now but can you keep him in the future (and will you want to?). In the long run (even with a stadium) it will be impossible to keep Cabrera and Ramirez (in addition to young pitchers like Olsen, Nolasco, Sanchez, Mitre, and Johnson). In fact with many of those joining the team at the same time, it seems that down the road the Marlins will hit a time when these young talented players will all be arbitration eligible during the same year and their salaries will increase exponentially. Even with a stadium, the Marlins will never have a revenue stream like the Yankees or Red Sox which will allow them to sign and keep all those players. In other words, Cabrera will either get traded some day or be lost to free agency. Alternatively, the Marlins could plan to keep Cabrera in the long run but that would mean planning on losing one of the other young talented players. Would you keep Cabrera, a player who has shown himself to be lazy and indifferent at times and who for two seasons now has been completely unable to control his physical conditioning and declining defensive skills, or do you keep the guys that hustle and will be able to do something other than hitting? Last I checked baseball does not maintain separate defensive and offensive squads. The concern is that while Cabrera will become the equivalent of Pavel Bure — offensively flashy, defensively useless, and always a member of a losing team, guys like Ramirez and Uggla are dedicated and hardworking.

    That leaves the last question — do you keep Cabrera now, knowing that he will be gone in the future? That depends on whether you can get the trade value you want. This team has many holes that need to be filled in. After last year, we can all admit there is much room for improvement. Trading Cabrera is the most efficient way to fill those holes while securing this team’s on-field future.

  • Opinion
    • fishatbat
    • RETWEETED
      6 years ago
    • 2013 update: Yes, I was wrong. Sucks.